"It is well to remember that the entire population of the universe, with one trifling exception, is composed of others." A.Holmes

Monday, August 1, 2011

Farm Junk & Sedums

Old farm junk, the kind of junk cast off into fields, barns, the dump. The milk cans were given to me by my father after he saved them from the metal salvage place he worked at.The old stove would still work fine if there was a need for it , but now serves me well in my back-yard as a place to grow sedums in thrown away pots & pans.
This little nest was found in our driveway after a windstorm.
This sedum is growing in an old pan stuck into an old metal chicken feeder.
A chicken bucket makes a handy-dandy planter for sedums too.
Sedums grow in arid conditions, and in the too-wet conditions we in the Pacific Northwest are used to. This has been an unusually wet year for us and my sedums are proving invaluable as a source of color and bloom. The honeybees especially are flocking to the sedum blossoms in droves, and for that alone the sedums deserve their right to grow where they please around here. Right now I have many white blossomed sedums showing their splendor, but the bright pink sedums are starting to show their color, as are the yellow blossomed sedums. All the rusty, hole-in-the-bottom buckets, old cast away pots & pans, old chicken feeders & waterers, old boots, interesting planters and wire baskets, are perfect for planting sedums. After planting, the care is simple ~ water when I remember and they will thrive, bloom, and make me and the bees happy ! Simple blessings are among the best of blessings.

15 comments:

Timi said...

Old farm junk? They look treasure to me :o)! And what a good idea to use them for the flowers!!! I like it!

Mildred said...

I love the ease of growing sedums and yours are especially beautiful growing in your farm treasures!

Southern Comfort said...

Everything old is new again...and beautifully planted. I love this "collection"!

goatpod2 said...

Very nice!

Blessings,

Amy

Pondside said...

Sedums are miraculous little plants, aren't they? They grow as easily in a lovely old pot as in a crack in a rock. They give a surprising hit of colour when and where I least expect it!

LindaSueBuhl said...

charming use of that which might be trash to some - we couldn't grow anything in those around here - small containers dry out FAR too fast at 110 degree air temps! Pretty though - very pretty - wonder what sedum honey will taste like?

romance-of-roses said...

Have been following you for awhile but never commented. I like your collection of planters, my son also enjoys planting in old containers. You have a lovely blog full of love and family, I love it.
Blessings to all...Lu

Vickie said...

Hi Kathy! I wonder if Sedums will grow in 100+ temps for 2 months? That's what we're going on here in East Texas! I love that old stove with all the old junque around it. Right up my alley! I'm glad you showed this photo today - I hadn't seen it before! Have a wonderful week!

Dolores said...

I love all your art treasures (not junk at all), you have a terrific assortment of neat planters.
Your Sedums are so beautiful, they'd hate our hot Texas weather and dryness.

Daisy said...

The chicken bucket made me laugh. I love the whimsy of it. Your sedums are a blessing indeed, Kathy. :)

Kathleen From Eggs In My Pocket said...

How pretty your "farm junk" looks all together! I love that old stove! blessings,Kathleen

Oregon Gifts of Comfort and Joy said...

So pretty!

Paula said...

Oh, Kathy~ everything looks so beautiful, but I had to let out a *squeeeal* over the chickie bucket! TOO cute!

That foolish lady! said...

I just happened upon this site via a picture & I feel like I have just met a soul mate. I can't wait to check out your site further.

Anonymous said...

I feel the same way as that foolish lady commented